What is the best peppermint essential oil to buy?

Peppermint Arvensis is found in many temperature parts of the world.

This oil’s primary constituents are Menthol, Menthone, Isomenthone, Menthyl acetate, Neomenthol, Limonene, and 3-Octanol.  What is important to recognize is that Arvensis is higher in Menthol. So high, in fact, the menthol is often extracted from the plant and sold as a separated extract.  When aromatic bath bombs and other such items are made, crystallized menthol is used as an addition.  Peppermint Arvensis also goes by the name of Cornmint.  It is inferior to the Piperita in terms of therapeutic potential, odor, and flavor.  Foreign companies, particularly in Asia, will sell Cornmint under the name of Peppermint.  This is why knowing which is which to be sure you are getting the correct chemotype.

Which Peppermint Essential Oil do you Have

This is another reason why asking for a Certificate of Analysis from your supplier is important.  Cornmint can be used to adulterate the oil, keeping the price lower.  On a Gas Chromatography analysis, a trained aromatherapist can pick out the marker peaks that identify a Cornmint addition.

Now some consumers actually do like Cornmint and don’t have a problem buying the oil identified as Arvensis, also sometimes named Japanese or Asian Peppermint.  If you bought this version, no worries, you could use Arvensis very successfully as an insect and rodent repellant or in your diffuser for an anti-bacterial boost.  The high menthol content is a big plus.  It will also still open airways effectively.

If you are after the “true” and sweeter peppermint aroma with better therapeutic outcomes, then you want Peppermint Piperita.  Yes, it is more expensive than Arvensis, but a little peppermint goes a long, long way, so we believe this is one case that is truly worth the price difference.

Uses for Peppermint Essential Oil

Don’t hesitate to reach out and ask.

Besides Lavender, it is one oil that has a place in your medicine cabinet and is beneficial when diffused throughout the home.  There are a myriad of uses for Peppermint Essential Oil.

1). Bug Repellant –  We love, love love this oil for this reason. Dampen a cotton ball with Peppermint essential oil and run it around the edge of your kitchen counter, at the base of your tile or along floor seams if you have intrusion from ants.  It will stop them in a heartbeat.  You will eventually have to re-apply, but it typically will work at least a week or two. (If you have pets, do not use on the floor).  A cloth with a few drops of peppermint is also great to put you in cedar chest for additional protection against moths!

2). Inhaling a mixture of peppermint and lemon essential oil can often mitigate the severity of headaches.  It has to be used before the headache has fully taken hold however.  Caution:  Peppermint can make a bad headache worse if it is too strong.

3). A mixture of peppermint essential oil and lavender are known to help alleviate morning sickness for many women.

4). Inhalation of peppermint though a personal diffuser helps with colds, sinus headaches and reducing respiratory infections due to its anti-bacterial properties.

5). If you suffer from irritable bowl sydrome, discuss with your doctor the option of taking encapsulated peppermint oil.  The capsules are formulated for delayed release and will keep the peppermint oil in tact until it reaches the deepest part of the colon where inflammation is occuring (it does not do any good to consume peppermint oil for this, it must be delayed release).

6). Remember, peppermint is a powerful oil and should not be heavily used around infants and children under ten. Too much peppermint is a severe irritant to subcutaneous and conjunctiva tissue.  Its use should also be avoided around dogs and cats as it can be toxic to their liver.  Use of any essential oil with a pet should be discussed with your veterinarian.